GIZMO

- Second year

- Individual project

Gizmo is a module designed to showcase creativity and technical ability. The brief set was to create an interactive mechatronic (mechanical-electronic) device with integrated actuating sensors. My final project was Colin the cyclist. Colin is designed so that the louder you cheer him on, the faster he cycles.

This project features a built in OLED screen, a microphone and an Arduino board. When a new user wants to interact, the screen prompts them to press the green button and then cheer Colin on. A louder cheer causes Colin to cycle faster! The user's high score is displayed at the end of the turn and the game resets for the next user to interact.

All coding was done in C using the Arduino software and physical build was completed using 3D printing and laser cutting technology. Code can be found on my GitHub

This project was exhibited in the Dyson School of Design Engineering Open House and Summer House, as well as being featured in an Imperial News article.

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I sketched my initial idea in my notebook for the first idea presentation. A rough 2D layout of front profile was drafted as well as possible features such as an interactive screen and a lifelike scene. A foam model was also made to estimate the size requirement for the device.

A bench top prototype was made to test initial 3D printed parts and an early iteration of the Arduino script. An OLED screen provides the user with a spectrum analyser to show the pitch and volume of their cheer.

A variety of parts were 3D printed, experimenting with different materials (PLA, ABS, nylon, carbon fibre) and geometries. The parts shown include a motor mount, crankset, bottom bracket hub and a gear train. I designed and modelled all parts using SolidWorks 2019.

A final assembly drawing was created, showcasing the main components. All components and subassemblies are dimensionally accurate. 

GIZMO took eight weeks to progress from initial concept ideation to final presentation and build. As shown, when a noise is made (whistling in this case for clarity) Colin cycles faster, and when the sound subsides he slows down. The small OLED screen shows the user their high score and a frequency response of their sound.